The Helper's Charge to Recharge: Doing and Becoming Our Best

Posted by Jennifer Sloan on February 20, 2019 in resilience, self care category

Recently a teenage client asked me a question that threw me, unexpectedly. (Over the years, I’ve amassed a considerable anthology of examples on what makes them famous for this gift, so it’s not an easy thing to do these days!)

I attended an engaging group session on characteristics of community and racial trauma, after which the group’s therapist allotted time for a “Q and A” between her adolescent clients and me, their guest. One member asked me, “How do you deal with trauma?” 

I started to summarize the vast nature of trauma, and the equally vast approaches to treating it – then asked him for an example of the type of trauma he was referring to. He repeated his question, “No – how do you deal with trauma?” 

“How do I?” I asked, taken aback.

“Yes,” he replied. “You hear about other people’s trauma every day, so how do you deal with it?” 

I was struck by the sophistication of his question, especially when I realized what he was really asking. He wasn’t asking me about my trauma, or how I’m impacted by other people’s trauma. He was asking me about my resilience! I paused to evaluate why I felt so caught off guard, and was reminded: As helpers, this is something we don’t discuss often enough.

I started listing some of my self-care practices: yoga, meditation, playing in an ensemble, spending time with loved ones and reflective consulting with supervisors. (Heads nodded as they recognized some of these as the very techniques they’re encouraged to adopt.) I summed up by echoing their therapist’s message on the universal requirement for dealing with trauma: “Just like you, I don’t do it alone.”

[Re]charging toward resilience.   

The helper bears significant weight in leading this complicated, and often painful, journey with clients. Sensory-based interventions assist us with helping clients access, activate, integrate and heal their body, mind and spirit – and the therapeutic relationship navigates this path, as we work to know our client’s trauma as they know it. The interventions offered through Starr Commonwealth (Zero to Three: Trauma Interventions, SITCAP®, Mind Body Skills, Expressive Arts Therapy, etc.) provide the tools to treat the psychophysiology of child trauma with activities that are:

  • relationship-based and experiential
  • adaptive to myriad stages of child development
  • inherently designed to foster empathic attunement within the therapeutic relationship 

The attunement we establish with the client can put us closer in touch with our own vulnerability, as we become proximate to theirs – while also providing the opportunity to connect with our own resiliency, as we help them build theirs. In doing so, we charge toward the horizon of resiliency, as our clients reclaim their power from a place of wholeness. 

What charges the charge?

We know that self-care is essential to maintaining health and wellness, and defending against the perils of secondary traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. Part of maintaining personal well-being includes solitary space to reflect. Whether on our yoga mat, steeped in a hot bath, sprawled on the masseuse’s table, napping, walking, running or cycling to achieve that meditative hum in perpetual motion, physical care is essential to a healthy mind, body and spirit. But how much of our self care are we doing alone?

A barrage of solitary self-care routines do not make a complete self-care practice.

Without relationship, connection and support in spaces where reflective processing occurs, our self-care practices leave us… alone. Staying healthy, staving off symptoms of secondary traumatic stress and avoiding compassion fatigue are all critical aims, of course. But, the act of being reflective within a relationship is critical, whether through individual or group supervision/consultation. Our dear friend, Dr. Jeree Pawl, PhD, offers us a wise navigational compass toward the parallel process, in The Platinum Rule:

Do unto others as you would have others do unto others.

We draw upon on the tenets of Polyvagal and Attachment Theories to provide sensory-based, integrated approaches to healing the individual and interpersonal wounds of trauma. We engage the fields of the brain and nervous systems to help our clients heal and achieve resiliency – and how we restore our own depleted systems informs our capacity to do so. As helpers, it’s our charge to sustain and advance this capacity. We require a space where we’re held with what we hold, seen with what we see, and can be shown what has not yet been revealed while reflecting on our own. Maintaining a reflective practice in a relationship helps elevate our ability to hold that crucial space for clients through the parallel process. Thinking about self-care as a means of advancing our efficacy as helpers prompts us to consider it as a key to simultaneously putting ourselves and our clients first. When we take better care of us, we take better care of them.   


Pawl, J. H., & St John, M. (1998). How You Are Is as Important as What You Do... in Making a Positive Difference for Infants, Toddlers and Their Families. Zero to Three, 734 15th Street, NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005-1013


 

Categories: resilience, self care
Jennifer Sloan

About Jennifer Sloan

Jennifer (Jenny) Sloan, LMSW, CTP-C  has more than 15 years of experience working with children youth and families in the fields of education and social work.  Jenny earned her Bachelor’s degree in Instrumental Music Education (K-12) with a dual Major in Sociology from Michigan State University, where she also taught undergraduate courses in the Integrated Social Sciences Department.  Jenny began her career as a certified music educator in the Detroit Public Schools system; where she taught K-12 General and Instrumental Music as the director of award-winning instrumental music programs, and served as a specialized student services instructor with cognitively impaired youth.  Jenny later completed her Master’s degree in Social Work at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, after which she worked as a home-based therapist with children and families referred through the Child Welfare Department in Wayne County, Detroit.  She has been employed with Spectrum Juvenile Justice Services (SJJS) since 2009, where she began as a therapist working with youth adjudicated of violent and sex offenses.  Throughout her tenure at SJJS, Jenny has been a lead contributor to therapeutic programming, authored company publications, and conducted ongoing trainings for the agency’s clinicians, management, direct care employees, community stakeholders (court officials, care management organizations, etc.) and partnering graduate schools and universities.  As the Associate Clinical Director at SJJS, Jenny oversees clinical programming and development, supervises clinical supervisors and Master’s level clinicians, and conducts company and community trainings.  Driven by her persistent interest in the intersections of trauma and delinquency, Jenny facilitates trainings including Trauma Informed Care Programming and Practices, Attachment Theory, Stress, Trauma & the Brain, and Cultural Humility/Competency.  Jenny is a Certified Trauma Practitioner (CTP-C) and Certified Trainer, and holds certification in Core Supervision through the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).  Jenny supervises Master’s level clinical interns as a Field Instructor with several colleges and universities, and actively attends state, national and international conferences, trainings and workshops on advancing research and treatment practices.

With her supervisees and colleagues, Jenny promotes the crucial practice of maintaining effective self care, and adheres to her own suggestions by maintaining a regular yoga practice.  Jenny also remains active in the arts community as a musician in a local community concert ensemble, and a regular patron of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

To schedule a training or consultation, please contact info@starr.org

Read Jennifer Sloan’s Bio

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